Dealing With Arch Pain

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Overview
A fallen arch or flatfoot is known medically as pes planus. The foot loses the gently curving arch on the inner side of the sole, just in front of the heel. If this arch is flattened only when standing and returns when the foot is lifted off the ground, the condition is called flexible pes planus or flexible flatfoot. If the arch disappears in both foot positions, standing and elevated, the condition is called rigid pes planus or rigid flatfoot.


What causes pain in the Achilles tendon?
Arch pain can be caused by several different factors. Tight calf muscles combined with repeated arch collapse on weight bearing, is the most common cause of arch pain.This can then often lead to a condition called plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of the connective tissue that connects the heel with the ball of the foot. When the connective tissue in the bottom of the feet gets stretched out too much, plantar fasciitis can result. The inflammation resulting from plantar fasciitis can result in arch pain. Arch pain caused by plantar fasciitis is often worst after long periods of rest, like when you first wake up in the morning. This is because the plantar fascia tightens when you are off your feet. When you wake up in the morning and start walking around, the plantar fascia stretches out again.

Symptoms
The primary symptom is pain or aching in the arch area. This can be accompanied by inflammation and tenderness. If the pain is caused by the plantar fascia, it is likely to be considerably more severe in the mornings due to the muscles being unused. If you notice that the twinges of pain you have are most commonly associated with or immediately after exercise, you might want to visit a good athletic shoe store to make sure you are wearing the right kind of shoe. Another cause of arch pain is plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a tough tissue structure that holds the bottom part of the arch in place. The fascia often becomes inflamed and sore, usually as a result of repetitive motion (for example, very common in those who stand on their feet for work). The pain is often noticeable first thing in the morning and worse with activity.

Diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show tendon injury and inflammation but cannot be relied on with 100% accuracy and confidence. The technique and skill of the radiologist in properly positioning the foot with the MRI beam are critical in demonstrating the sometimes obscure findings of tendon injury around the ankle. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is expensive and is not necessary in most cases to diagnose posterior tibial tendon injury. Ultrasound has also been used in some cases to diagnose tendon injury, but this test again is usually not required to make the initial diagnosis.

Non Surgical Treatment
Changes in shoes to include more supportive sport shoes or walking shoes that have a softer footbed. Oral anti-inflammatories including over-the-counter medications such as Brufen can help acute flare ups. Prescription strength anti-inflammatories prescribed by your GP or doctor. Prescription Transdermal Verapamil gel, which can reduce scar tissue. Anti-inflammatory injections (cortisone-type medications) into the mass and surrounding areas to decrease the inflammation. Stretching exercises, this may worsen the problem as it stretches the area of tear. Massage including tennis ball orfrozen water bottle massage of the arch - as with stretching this may worsen the problem. Taping or strapping of the foot, arch or ankle to reduce the pressure on the plantar fascia. Long term conservative treatment should include custom moulded functional orthotics. The orthotics should have an accommodation for the plantar fibroma, this is probably the best conservative treatment for plantar fibroma.


Surgical Treatment
Surgical advances have dramatically improved the ability to alleviate the pain and decreased function that millions of Americans experience due to flat feet. Nevertheless, many patients and even some physicians remain unaware of the new procedures, which are best performed by a foot and ankle specialist who has the applicable training and experience.


Prevention
Stretch and strengthen important muscles in your feet, ankles and legs in order to guard against future strain. Make sure to acquire suitable arch supports and inserts if necessary, and that your shoes are shock absorbent and in good condition. Wearing tattered shoes provides no protection, and runners should replace their footwear before exceeding 500 miles of usage. Athletes new to arch supports should gradually build their training routine, allowing their feet to become accustomed to a new stance.

Stretching Exercises
Strength training and stretching can help avoid injury and keep your feet free from pain. Stretching should focus on the bottom of your foot to loosen tissues and tight ligaments surrounding your arch. The easiest way to do this is by grabbing a towel and sitting on the floor. You can do this while you catch up on the news in the morning, or when you get home from work. Put one leg out in front with your foot flexed up. Loop the towel around the ball of your foot and gently pull your toes towards you. Hold for thirty seconds and then repeat 3-4 times before switching feet.